Ivy Tech’s Distinguished Lecture Series will feature David J. Smith, an expert in peacebuilding and community colleges who has assisted with conflict resolution in Ferguson, MO.

The role of community colleges in building peace and providing a globally-focused education will be the topic of Ivy Tech Community College Lafayette’s Distinguished Lecture presented by David J. Smith. He will discuss the importance of advancing awareness of peacebuilding strategies to ensure a society that embraces differences, respects human rights, and resolves conflict nonviolently.

Building Peace: Making the Local to Global Connection will be presented on Monday, October 13, at 6:00 p.m. in the NCHS Auditorium in Ivy Hall on the Ivy Tech Lafayette campus at 3101 S. Creasy Lane. The one-hour lecture will be followed by a question and answer session. The lecture is open to the public.

Smith is a noted authority on peacebuilding, conflict resolution, and civic and global education. He edited Peacebuilding in Community Colleges: A Teaching Resource, a guide for educators and administrators in strengthening global education and promoting educational strategies to advance peace.

He recently visited St. Louis Community College and met with students, faculty, and administrators at the Forest Park and Florissant Valley campuses. Florissant Valley is located in Ferguson, MO. The purpose of the visit was to assess the impact of the events this past August that resulted in ongoing tension and consider ways in which the college can advance social justice, human rights, civic engagement, conflict resolution, and other educational means of making a positive impact on the community.

“Global education is a vital component of every community college mission,” Smith said. “Education can play an important role in promoting more peaceful worldviews while giving students the skills and perspectives they need to succeed in a globalized world.”

A former senior manager for educational outreach in USIP’s Global Peacebuilding Center, Smith is a conflict resolution practitioner and educator. He currently serves as chair of the Human Rights Commission of Rockville, Maryland, and teaches at George Mason University’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association

Ivy Tech students and administrators will participate in Washington DC gathering to discuss interfaith community service and civic engagement

Representatives from Ivy Tech Community College Lafayette have been invited to participate in the President’s Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge Gathering in Washington DC on September 22 and 23. The event will be held at George Washington University. The event offers an opportunity for students, staff, and administrators from higher education institutions to share experiences, learn from experts, and meet administration officials who share a commitment to community service with an interfaith engagement component.

The invitation comes on the heels of being named to the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. Ivy Tech Lafayette was recognized for its role in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement.

Conference participants from Ivy Tech Lafayette are: Chancellor Dr. David Bathe; Executive Director of Diversity, Engagement, and International Programs Andrew Antonio; Director of Student Life and Leadership Kat Stremiecki; and Ivy Tech students John Bullock and Jake Retherford.

Dr. Bathe will join college presidents and chancellors from participating institutions in a White House Forum on September 22. The forum will include presentations from foundations and other organizations that support interfaith/community service on college campuses. College leaders will have the opportunity to engage funders and program supporters.

“It is a privilege to be invited to the White House Forum as a representative for the region,” Dr. Bathe said. “However, it is the work of the students, college staff and Greater Lafayette community that is being recognized. It is significant that the administration recognizes the tie between faith and the desire and responsibility to serve that is deeply rooted in American history and culture.”

Antonio, Stremiecki and Bullock will present Intersection Connection Helps Define the “C” in YMCA during the conference. Their presentation will highlight Intersection Connection, a collaboration among the College, the Lafayette Family YMCA and Junior Achievement. They will illustrate how a state college, a Christian organization, and a non-profit can create space and programming to enliven and enrich lives in the community.

“As a community college, it’s important for us to not only have quality academic programs, but also for students and college staff to volunteer in faith-based initiatives,” Antonio said. “Giving our students avenues of success in the classroom and the community, and providing ways that our staff and faculty can give back to the community, is a goal that we all can share.”

The group will arrive in Washington DC on Sunday, September 21, to participate in the 9/11 Unity Walk. The walk is a display of unity among all houses of worship on Embassy Row that open their doors to each other in a striking display of hospitality. Christians, Muslims, Jews, Sikhs, Hindus, other faiths, and those of no faith tradition, come together to learn about each other, enjoy great food, and create friendships. The walk includes moving speeches, thought provoking dialogue, and service projects.

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech Lafayette honors founders by naming streets on the Lafayette campus

Ivy Tech Community College Lafayette has named several streets on the Lafayette campus to honor those who have contributed to the development of the south side campus. The individuals and surviving families were honored during a Founder’s Day celebration on September 15.

Honorees included:

The late Alton Potts, the founding administrator of the region, served until 1978. During his tenure, the region started with literally nothing and grew to 1000 students.

The late Dr. Thomas Reckerd headed the region beginning in 1978 until his retirement in 1990. The development of the Lafayette campus began under his administration.

Joe Bumbleburg, a Lafayette attorney, was the college’s legal counsel during a land swap with the county that created the current Lafayette campus.

President Emeritus Gerald Lamkin served as the college’s President from 1983 until his retirement in 2007. The college made great strides in growth and expansion during his administration, and grew in stature throughout the state.

Dr. Robert Sorensen joined Ivy Tech Lafayette as regional financial officer in 1986. He was instrumental in developing the computer infrastructure for the campus expansion, as well as planning associated with building construction.

Kathy Vernon is a Distinguished Alumna of Ivy Tech, and has volunteered her time to the college in many roles, including her current appointment to the Regional Board of Trustees beginning in 1986.

“The students, faculty and staff are forever grateful to these Founders for the impact they have had on over 350,000 lives since the creation of Ivy Tech Lafayette,” said Lafayette Chancellor Dr. David Bathe. “Their service in establishing Ivy Tech as a quality institution of higher education has been essential to the economic vitality of Greater Lafayette, and the continued advancement of our community.”

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

Founders Day Biographies

Alton Potts
Alton Potts attended Ball State University where he earned a bachelor of science degree in education and a master of arts degree in guidance and counseling, and he also completed graduate course work at IUPUI. Prior to coming to Ivy Tech, Mr. Potts had a background in public and labor relations. His first assignment at the college in 1967 was coordinator of curriculum and instruction for the central office in Indianapolis, and he was soon appointed director of the newly formed Region Four that was based in Lafayette. During his tenure, the region started with literally nothing and grew rapidly. Many new programs were launched, accreditation for the region and health programs were attained, the Ross Building and Tippy Building were leased, and plans were made for the construction of the Technology Building, now named Griffin Hall. Dean Potts left the Lafayette region in 1978 after ten years of service to rejoin the staff at Central Office. Enrollment at the region had grown to 1000 students.

Thomas Reckerd
When Thomas Reckerd was appointed Dean of the Lafayette region, then Ivy Tech President Glenn Sample described him as “the most knowledgeable person in Indiana in the field of vocational education.” Dr. Reckerd left a position as a full professor at Indiana State University to take the reins of the region. At the time of his appointment, the college was expanding rapidly with new degree offerings and the groundbreaking for the Technology Building in October 1979. Under his leadership, the Industrial Training Division, the precursor to Ivy Tech Corporate College, was established in January, 1983, to provide workforce training to area businesses and industries, and the associate degree in nursing program was introduced in 1986. Dr. Reckerd stepped down as dean of the region in 1990.

Joe Bumbleburg
Joe Bumbleburg has served the college as the Lafayette Region’s representative on the Ivy Tech State Board as Chairman and Trustee. He acted as the college’s legal counsel during the land swap that created the Lafayette campus, and his efforts and commitment provided the foundation for the funding of Ivy Hall. Mr. Bumbleburg is the president and senior member at the law firm Ball, Eggleston, PC in Lafayette. He joined the firm in 1964 after serving three years with the U.S. army as an officer of the Judge Advocate Corps. He is former president of United Way of Greater Lafayette, the Community Foundation, and the Greater Lafayette Chamber of Commerce, former National Governor of the American Red Cross, and the recipient of the Harriman Award for Distinguished Volunteer Service from the American National Red Cross.

Gerald Lamkin
Gerald Lamkin is a native Hoosier, and earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Indiana State University. After a short time teaching in St. Louis, Mr. Lamkin returned to teach in Indianapolis schools, and earning a master’s degree in business education from Indiana State and an administrative license from Ball State. He started teaching part-time at Ivy Tech in 1967, and became a full-time instructor the following year. He later served as Dean of the Muncie region and later the Richmond region. He returned to the central office as Vice President of Administration in 1979, and became the college’s sixth President on January 1, 1983. During his tenure as President, the college made great strides in expanding college programs and campuses, constructed new academic buildings, posted record enrollments, and grew in stature throughout the state. The pinnacle of his presidency occurred on July 1, 2005 when by legislative action, Ivy Tech became Ivy Tech Community College. Mr. Lamkin retired as the college’s chief executive on July 1, 2007 and became president-emeritus.

Bob Sorensen
Bob Sorensen joined Ivy Tech as the regional financial officer in the fall of 1986. He immediately began updating the region’s accounting systems. In 1990, Dr. Sorensen oversaw the design and implementation of one of the first computer/audio-visual class rooms in the Ivy Tech system. He spent a great deal of time developing the computing infrastructure for the campus expansion, as well as the planning, budgeting and accounting associated with building construction. In 2001 he went to work for the central office in Indianapolis, where he started the conversion of the college’s mainframe computer systems to a server-based system and developed a statewide network infrastructure. He completed his doctorate degree in education administration at Purdue, and taught graduate courses in that program, and continued to teach accounting in the Krannert School of Management for two years after his retirement from Ivy Tech in 2006. Dr. Sorensen continues to serve on accreditation teams for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, a role he began while still at Ivy Tech. He is past president of the Central Association of College and University Business Officers, and served on the national association’s board, where he was presented the Daniel Robinson Award for contributions to the field of accounting.

Kathy Vernon
Kathy Vernon is an alumna of Ivy Tech Community College-Lafayette, receiving an associate degree in respiratory care in 1978. She served on the Advisory Committee for the Respiratory Care Program, and was one of the first to serve on the college’s Resource Development Council. She was the first to be named a Distinguished Alumna of Ivy Tech in 1991. She joined the Regional Board of Trustees in 1996, and is a past chair, past vice chair and past secretary. She was involved in fundraising for the development of the Lafayette campus, and currently represents the college on the Library Board. She and her husband Randy established a scholarship for radiation therapy students on the Bloomington campus. Mrs. Vernon is Executive Territory Business Manager in the Cardiovascular Division for Bristol-Myers Squibb. She served as a West Lafayette city councilwoman from 1992-1998, and was president of the council from 1996-1997. She served as a Tippecanoe County councilwoman at large from 2001-2012, and was president of the council from 2004-2005. She is currently running for Tippecanoe County Council District 3 in the 2014 election. She is a graduate of Leadership Lafayette, served as a loaned campaign representative for United Way, and had volunteered for various organizations including Almost Home Humane Society and the American Heart Association.

Ivy Tech professor Ken Mueller wrote a book on Senator Thomas Benton, an important political figure of 19th century politics

A new book on Thomas Hart Benton, senator from Missouri from 1821 to 1851, has been authored by Ken Mueller, associate professor and program chair of General Studies in Ivy Tech Community College Lafayette’s School of Liberal Arts. The book has been published by Northern Illinois University Press. The volume is part of Northern Illinois’ American Places Series, funded by the Andrew Mellon Foundation.

The book originated from Dr. Mueller’s doctoral dissertation for Saint Louis University. When he became aware that no book on Benton’s life had been published since 1956, he committed to creating a new interpretive framework for understanding Benton’s importance in political events leading to the Civil War.

“I sought to incorporate Benton’s attitudes towards blacks, Indiana removal, Mexico and gender relations into the traditional narratives that had emphasized his role in Jackson’s Bank War, the rise of democracy, and controversies that led to the Civil War,” Mueller said.

The book received a positive review from Michael Morrison, associate professor of history at Purdue University and specialist in 19th century American politics. “Mueller has provided a number of persuasive correctives to the extant biographies of Benton,” Dr. Morrison said. “He has also made a number of interesting, original contributions of his own. An updated and comprehensive treatment of Benton’s politics is overdue.”

The book can be ordered at www.niupress.niu.edu.

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

Preview of Art on the Wabash collection on display at Ivy Tech Community College

A preview of artists who will participate in the upcoming 9th Annual Art on the Wabash is on display at Ivy Tech Community College-Lafayette in Ivy Hall’s Grand Hall. The display is open to the public now through September 12. Ivy Tech Community College is located at 3101 S. Creasy Lane, Lafayette.

Most of the 42 participating artists have pieces in the preview. Artists who will have works on display at Ivy Tech are:

Jewelry: Joanne Kuhn Titolo, Linda Elmore, Lisa Walsh, and Carolyn Cason.

Potters: Mary Thomas Firestone, Scott Frankenberger, Diana May, Nancy Grenard, Frank Koontz, Gail Johnston, and Ingrid Craft & Rachael Schatko of Coal Creek Clay.

Glass: Sharon Owens and Kathryn Bodine.

Wood: Dave Barnett.

Gourds: Deb Remsburg.

Pysanky (batik on eggshells): Susan Blubaugh.

Photography: Dwayne Daehler and Alan McConnell.

Paintings: Rebecca Brody, Alice Harpel, Roxie L. Hannemann, Rena Brouwer, Jerie Artz, and Daniel Driggs.

Art on the Wabash, a juried art fair, takes place Sunday, September 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Tapawingo Park in West Lafayette.

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public post-secondary institution and the nation’s largest singly-accredited statewide community college system with more than 200,000 students enrolled annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana.  It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana.  It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech-Lafayette signs faculty and student exchange agreement with Mexican university

A delegation of faculty and staff from Ivy Tech Community College-Lafayette recently visited Technological University of Querétaro (UTEQ), Mexico and entered into a collaboration agreement that will lead to student exchanges that will broaden their cultural and learning experiences.

Dr. Todd Roswarski (left), Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs for Ivy Tech-Lafayette, and Lecona Salvador Uribe (center), Rector of UTEQ, sign the collaboration agreement between the two colleges as Andrew Antonio (right), Executive Director of Diversity and Engagement, looks on.

Dr. Todd Roswarski (left), Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs for Ivy Tech-Lafayette, and Lecona Salvador Uribe (center), Rector of UTEQ, sign the collaboration agreement between the two colleges as Andrew Antonio (right), Executive Director of Diversity and Engagement, looks on.

Prior to signing the agreement, the Ivy Tech delegation met for two days with the academic staff of UTEQ to identify, discuss and compare educational programs with the goal to arrange future exchanges.

The partnership also finalized a faculty exchange agreement that has already bore fruit. Three faculty members from UTEQ visited the Lafayette campus for two weeks as guest lecturers to build collaborations between academic programs and present their research to Ivy Tech students.

Lecona Salvador Uribe, rector of UTEQ, said that he hopes the meeting “is the formal beginning of a relationship between the two institutions, and both students and faculty will mutually benefit.”

Todd Roswarski, Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs at Ivy Tech-Lafayette, said, “I think we made great progress in these two and a half days, not only in what we accomplished academically, but also in building friendships.”

Members of Ivy Tech delegation also included Andrew Antonio, Executive Director of Diversity and Engagement; Isaac Rivera, Dean of the School of Applied Science and Engineering Technology; David Ely, Chair of the Pre-Engineering Program; Aaron Baute, Chair of the Business Administration Program, and Alan Bunning, Professor in the School of Computing and Informatics.

About Ivy Tech
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech’s Automotive Institute gets students into the workforce sooner

Starting a career in automotive technology can happen within one year thanks to Ivy Tech Community College’s Automotive Institute. Anyone interested in this accelerated program is invited to attend an open house on Tuesday, July 14, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Automotive Institute Lab at 3535 McCarty Lane, behind the Goodrich Theater.

Students in the Automotive Institute program earn a technical certificate and are prepared for ASE certification in forty weeks. Classes are offered in five, 8-week terms, and meet five days per week, for six hours per day. The technical certificate transfers into Ivy Tech’s associate degree program in Automotive Technology for student interested in continuing their education.

The Automotive Institute is NATEF accredited, and Ivy Tech is a Snap-On National Training Center. For more information, contact Carl Booker at (765) 838-8387 or cbooker22@ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities. In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.